Rules      FAQ       Register        Login
It is currently March 7th, 2021, 4:38 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Battle of the Fords of Isen ~ Planning
PostPosted: December 28th, 2017, 6:58 am 
Dunedain Ranger of Arnor
Dunedain Ranger of Arnor
User avatar

Joined: 02 January 2007
Posts: 3428
Location: The Lakeshore of Annúminas
Country: Gondor (xg)

Offline
This RP will be focused on one event.... well, two events in one space of time. It will be mostly a 'battle' RP at the Fords of Isen. The 1st battle saw the fall of Theodred, who would be the main canon LotR character. Other canon names would be Erkenbrand and Elfhelm. It is based on the chapter The Battle of the Fords of Isen in the book Unfinished Tales and also the same time in The Two Towers. if there is any interest from anyone who would like to write something like this, express your interest here and I'll post the full outline and setting and kick it off. Feel free to post any characters you will write here.

_________________
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Dunedain Ranger of the North
Annalist, Physician, & Historian
of The Black Company of the Dúnedain,
The Free Company of Arnor


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Battle of the Fords of Isen ~ Planning
PostPosted: December 28th, 2017, 7:05 am 
Elf
Elf
User avatar

Joined: 01 November 2017
Posts: 1166
Location: The Forbidden Pool
Country: Gondor (xg)
Gender: Female

Offline
Interested - will give me the opportunity to flesh out Freja's half brother - Ióen.

_________________
R'AMEN


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Battle of the Fords of Isen ~ Planning
PostPosted: December 29th, 2017, 2:43 am 
Dunedain Ranger of Arnor
Dunedain Ranger of Arnor
User avatar

Joined: 02 January 2007
Posts: 3428
Location: The Lakeshore of Annúminas
Country: Gondor (xg)

Offline
It was an old TORC RP that was going back in '01 when the site crashed and all was lost.
I always had an interest in this little part of the story. Would make a good RP story kind of like Rogue One in Star Wars.

_________________
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Dunedain Ranger of the North
Annalist, Physician, & Historian
of The Black Company of the Dúnedain,
The Free Company of Arnor


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Battle of the Fords of Isen ~ Planning
PostPosted: December 29th, 2017, 11:00 pm 
Elf
Elf
User avatar

Joined: 01 November 2017
Posts: 1166
Location: The Forbidden Pool
Country: Gondor (xg)
Gender: Female

Offline
Cool... So, first battle then? I might place two characters - one with Grimbold (Ióen) and one with Elfhelm (Freja?)

Extract from Unfinished Tales - 1980, pp 460 - 465:

Quote:
The chief obstacles to an easy conquest of Rohan by Saurman were Théodred and Éomer: they were vigorous men, devoted to the King, and high in his affections, as his only son and sister-son; and they did all that they could to thwart the influence over him that Grima gained when the King's health began to fail. This occurred early in the year 3014, when Théoden was sixty-six; his malady may thus have been due to natural causes, though the Rohirrim commonly lived to near or beyond their eightieth year. But it may well have been induced by subtle poisons, administered by Grima. In any case Théoden's sense of weakness and dependence on Grima was largely due to the cunning and skill of this evil counsellor's suggestions. It was his policy to bring his chief opponents into discredit with Théoden, and if possible get rid of them. It proved impossible to set them at odds with one another. Théoden before his 'sickness' had been much loved by all his kin and people, and the loyalty of Théodred and Éomer proved steadfast, even in his apparent dotage. Éomer also was not an ambitious man, and his love and respect for Théodred (thirteen years older than he) was only second to his love of his foster-father. Grima therefore tried to play them one against the other in the mind of Théoden, representing Éomer as ever eager to increase his own authority and to act without consulting the King or his Heir. In this he had some success, which bore fruit when Saruman at last succeeded in achieving the death of Théodred.

It was clearly seen in Rohan, when the true accounts of the battles at the Fords were known, that Saruman had given special orders that Théodred should at all costs be slain. At the first battle all his fiercest warriors were engaged in reckless assaults upon Théodred and his guard, disregarding other events of the battle, which might otherwise have resulted in a much more damaging defeat for the Rohirrim. When Théodred was at last slain Saruman's commander (no doubt under orders) seemed satisfied for the time being, and Saurman made the mistake; fatal as it proved, of not immediately throwing in more forces and proceeding at once to a massive invasion of Westfold, though the valour of Grimbold and Elfhelm contributed to his delay. If the invasion of Westfold had begun five days earlier, there can be little doubt that the reinforcements from Edoras would never have bome near Helm's Deep, but would have been surrounded and overwhelmed in the open plain; if indeed Edoras itself not been attacked and captured before the arrival of Gandalf.

It has been said that the valour of Grimbold and Elfwine contributed to Saurman's delay, which provided disastrous for him. The above account perhaps underestimated its importance.

The Isen cam down swiftly from its sources above Isengard, but in the flat land of the Gap it became slow until it turned west; then it flowed on through country falling by long slopes down into the low-lying coast-lands of furthest Gondor and the Enedwaith, and it became deep and rapid. Just above this westward bend were the Fords of Isen. There the river was broad and shallow, passing in two arms about a large eyot, over a stony shelf covered with stones and pebbles brought down from the north. Only here, south of Isengard, was it possible for large forces, especially those heavily armed or mounted, to cross the river. Saruman thus had this advantage: he could send his troops down either side of the Isen and attack the Fords, if they were held against him, from both sides. Any force of his west of Isen could if necessary retreat upon Isengard. On the other hand, Théodred might send men across the Fords, either in sufficient strength to engage Saruman's troops or to defend the western bridge-head; but if they were worsted, they would have no retreat except back over the Fords with the enemy at their heels, and possibly also awaiting them on the eastern bank. South and west along the Isen they had no way hom, unless they were provisioned for a long journey into Western Gondor.

Saruman's attack was not unforeseen, but it came sooner than was expected. Théodred's scouts had warned him of a mustering of troops before the Gates of Isengard, mainly (as it seemed) on the west side of the Isen. He therefore manned the approaches, east and west, to the Fords with sturdy men on foot from the levies of Westfold. Leaving three companies of Riders, together with horse-herds and spare mounts, on the east bank, he himself passed over with the main strength of his cavalry; eight companies and a company of archers, intending to overthrow Saruman's army before it was fully prepared.

But Saruman had not revealed his intentions nor the full strength of his forces. They were already on the march when Théodred set out. Some twenty miles north of the Fords he encountered their vanguard and scattered it with loss. But when he rode on to attack the main host the resistance stiffened. The enemy was in fact in positions prepared for the event, behind trenches manned by pikemen, and Théodred in the leading éored was brought to a stand and almost surrounded, for new forces hastening from Isengard were now outflanking him upon the west.

He was extricated by the onset of the companions coming up behind him; but as he looked eastward he was dismayed. It had been a dim and misty morning, but the mists were now rolling back through the Gap on a breeze from the west, and away east of the river he descried other forces now hastening towards the Fords, though their strength could not be guessed. He at once ordered a retreat. This the Riders, well trained in the manoeuvre, managed in good order and with little further loss; but the enemy was not shaken off or long outdistanced, for the retreat was often delayed, when the rearguard of Grimbold was obliged to turn at bay and drive back the most eager of their pursuers.

When Théodred gained the Fords the day was waning. He set Grimbold in command of the garrison on the west bank, stiffened with fifty dismounted Riders. The rest of his Riders and all the horses he at once sent across the river, save his own company: with these on foot he manned the eyot, to cover the retreat of Grimbold if he was driven back. This was barely done when disaster came. Saruman's eastern force came down with unexpected speed; it was much smaller than the western force, but more dangerous. In its van were some Dunlending horsemen and a great pack of the dreadful Orcish wolfriders, feared by horses. Behind them came two battalions of the fierce Uruks, heavily armed but trained to move at great speed for many miles. The horsemen and wolfriders fell on the horse-herds and picketed horses and slew or dispersed them. The garrison of the east bank, surprised by the sudden assault of the massed Uruks, was swept away, and the riders that had just crossed from the west were caught still in disarray, and though the fought desperately they were driven from the Fords along the line of the Isen with the uruks in pursuit.

As soon as the enemy had gained possession of the eastern end of the Fords there appeared a company of men or orc-men (evidently dispatched for the purpose), ferocious, mail-clad, and armed with axes. They hastened to the eyot and assailed it from both sides. At the same time Grimbold n the west bank was attacked by Saruman's forces on that side of the Isen. As he looked eastwards, dismayed by the sounds of battle and the hideous orc-cries of victory, he saw the axe-men driving Théodred's men from the shores of the eyot to the low knoll in its centre, and he heard Théodred's great voice crying To men, Eorlingas! At once Grimbold, taking a few men that stood near him, ran back to the eyot. So fierce was his onset from the rear of the attackers that Grimbold, a man of great strength and stature, clove his way through, till with two others he reached Théodred standing at bay on the knoll. Too late. As he came to his side Théodred fell, hewn down by a great orc-man. Grimbold slew him and stood over the body of Théodred, thinking him dead; and there he would himself soon have died, but for the coming of Elfhelm.

Elfhelm had been riding in haste along the horse-road from Edoras, leading four companies in answer to Théodred's summons; he was expecting battle, but not yet for some days. But near the junction of the horse-road with the road down from the Deeping his outriders on the right flank reported that two wolfriders had been seen abroad on the fields. Sensing that things were amiss, he did not turn aside to Helm's Deep for the night as he had intended but rode with all speed towards the Fords. The horse-road turned north-west after its meeting with the Deeping-road, but again bent sharply west when level with the Fords, which it approached by a straight path of some two miles long. Elfhelm thus heard and saw nothing of the fighting when he drew near the last bend in the road, and there encountered some horses running wild and few fugitives who told him of the disaster. Though his men and horses were now weary he rode as fast as he could along the straight, and as he came in sight of the east bank he ordered his companies to charge.

It was the turn of the Isengarders to be surprised. They heard the thunder of hooves, and saw coming like black shadows against the darkening East a great host (as it seemed) with Elfhelm at its head, and beside him a white standard borne as a guide to those that followed. Few stood their ground. Most fled northwards, pursued by two of Elfhelm's companies. The others he dismounted to guard the east bank, but at once with the men of his own company rushed to the eyot. The axemen were now caught between the surviving defenders and the onslaught of Elfhelm, with both banks still held by the Rohirrim. They fought on, but before the end were slain to a man. Elfhelm himself, however, sprang up towards the knoll; and there he found Grimbold fighting two great axemen for possession of Théodred's body. One Elfhelm slew, and the other fell before Grimbold.

They stooped then to lift the body, and found that Théodred still breathed; but he lived only long enough to speak his last words: Let me lie here - to keep the Fords till Éomer comes! Night fell. A harsh horn sounded, and then all was silent. The attack on the west bank ceased, and the enemy there faded away into the dark. The Rohirrim held the Fords of Isen; but their losses were heavy, not least in horses; the King's son was dead, and they were leaderless, and did not know what might yet befall.

When after a cold and sleepless night the grey light returned there was no sign of the Isengarders, save those many that they left for dead upon the field. Wolves were howling far off, waiting for the living men to depart. Many men scattered by the sudden assault of the Isengarders began to return, some still mounted, some leading horses recaptured. Later in the morning most of Théodred's Riders that had been driven south down the river by a battalion of black Uruks came back battle-worn but in good order. They a like tale to tell. They came to a stand on a low hill and prepared to defend it. Though they had drawn off part of the attacking force of Isengard, retreat south unprovisioned was in the end hopeless. The Uruks had resisted any attempt to burst eastwards, and were driving them towards the now hostile country of the Dunlendish 'west-marsh'. But as the Riders prepared to resist their assault, though it was now full night, a horn was sounded; and soon they discovered that the enemy had gone. They had too few horses to attempt any pursuit, or even to act as scouts, so far as that would have availed by night. After some time they began cautiously to advance north again, but met no opposition. They thought that the Uruks had gone back to reinforce their hold on the FOrds, and expected there to meet in battle again, and they wondered much to find the Rohirrim in command. It was not till later that they discovered whither the Uruks had gone.

So ended the First Battle of the Fords of Isen. Of the Second Battle no such clear accounts were ever made, owing to the much greater events that immediately followed.

_________________
R'AMEN


Top
 Profile                  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 4 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  




Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Boyz theme by Zarron Media 2003