Rules      FAQ       Register        Login
It is currently May 19th, 2019, 12:44 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: April 1st, 2009, 10:27 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 03 June 2005
Posts: 13144
Location: Heaven: Rockin' with Severus Snape
Country: England (en)
Gender: Female

Offline
I completely forgot about Lord of the Flies! That one is definitely one of my favourites. :yes: I think it's amazing how people come up with this kind of stuff. I'd love to write some dystopian literature myself someday.


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 25th, 2011, 2:52 am 
Tolkien Scholar
Tolkien Scholar
User avatar

Joined: 12 July 2005
Posts: 8885

Offline
I'm rather surprised I didn't post in here yet.

I read the following: 1984, Animal Farm, Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451 but the thing is it's been so long since I've read them so I'm not quite sure I would understand it all. More recently I've read Blindness, A Clockwork Orange, The Handsmaid's Tale, and Battle Royale and I've enjoyed all of them.

_________________
Image
I was cured all right.


Top
 Profile       WWW            
 
 Post subject: Re: Utopian & Dystopian Literature
PostPosted: March 19th, 2011, 6:05 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 03 June 2005
Posts: 13144
Location: Heaven: Rockin' with Severus Snape
Country: England (en)
Gender: Female

Offline
I've been meaning to read Blindness. Is it any good?


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Utopian & Dystopian Literature
PostPosted: March 19th, 2011, 7:23 pm 
Tolkien Scholar
Tolkien Scholar
User avatar

Joined: 12 July 2005
Posts: 8885

Offline
Blindness is rather good. Jose Saramago has an interesting writing style where everything flows without punctuations or quotation marks and the like. The way he writes you can actually feel quite blind going through the world.

_________________
Image
I was cured all right.


Top
 Profile       WWW            
 
 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: June 12th, 2011, 5:59 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 04 June 2005
Posts: 12592
Gender: Female

Offline
ethelfleda wrote:
in my opinion, 1984 is easily the greatest dystopian novel ever written, and one of the greatest books of all time. for me, even scarier than the torture and the surveillance, is the idea of the state stripping down the language until there are no words with which people can express their dissatisfaction with society, so eventually they won't be capable of even thinking anything against the state. freedom of speech and action is one thing, but freedom of thought is even more important - the idea of the state having absolute control over the thoughts of the people really freaked me out.

It has been quoted before but it deserves to be repeated. The idea that when you limit the language to the point where people are only able to communicate the most basic then you truly kill all other thinking and dreaming. So interesting how connected thought and language is.

_________________
>>Be the change you wish to see in the world<<
Image

Image
Banner credit: Shadowcat & Nurrantiel Mashiara


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Utopian & Dystopian Literature
PostPosted: June 15th, 2011, 12:22 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 03 June 2005
Posts: 13144
Location: Heaven: Rockin' with Severus Snape
Country: England (en)
Gender: Female

Offline
I'd actually care to disagree with that. Having recently read Yevgeny Zamyatin's WE [which is often toted as the "original" dystopian novel] the idea of government being so total as to be able to control thought is not a new concept. Certainly an interesting and terrifying prospect, but not new. In fact, I would say WE takes the idea a step further as by the end of the novel every member of the One State is subjected to the Operation [essentially a lobotomy] that makes it impossible to dream, imagine, or otherwise compose opposing thoughts in response to what citizens see around them.


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Utopian & Dystopian Literature
PostPosted: June 15th, 2011, 1:18 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 04 June 2005
Posts: 12592
Gender: Female

Offline
^Oh, but I didn't claim that 1984 was the original or the first novel dealing with totalitarian regimes. I was merely supporting the notion that limiting freedom of thought is devastating. I think the whole concept is interesting. Especially, the fact that the Party in 1984 wants to "cure" rebels. They would never kill a person who has rebellious or opposing thoughts in his body or his brain because in that case there would still be resistance. Therefore they must brainwash and break people into complete submissionn. Even to the point where the victims will eventually confess a genuine love for Big Brother.

_________________
>>Be the change you wish to see in the world<<
Image

Image
Banner credit: Shadowcat & Nurrantiel Mashiara


Top
 Profile                  
 
 Post subject: Re: Utopian & Dystopian Literature
PostPosted: June 28th, 2011, 12:37 pm 
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: 14 June 2005
Posts: 8567
Location: Missoula, Montana
Country: United States (us)
Gender: Female

Offline
I've read some Utopian/Dystopian literature in the past, and I just ... I don't know. I can't seem to like any of it.

The exception being "1984" of course. Why this and no other? Probably because of what ethelfleda said about it.

Perhaps it's because I didn't read it for class that I got so much more enjoyment out of it than the others.

I've read "The Giver," "Lord of the Flies," "Anthem" and "Brave New World." None of which I enjoyed. All of which were required reading in school. :duh:

I actually thought "Brave New World" was good for about the first half of the book. And then it basically turned into "Anthem." At least to me. And I hate "Anthem." Hate is an understatement when it comes to that book. :P I think the only reason I was able to come through BNW without completely hating it was because it was read for on of my Political Theory courses, and I got to tear it apart with Plato and Aristotle in a paper. :lol: I don't like to "study" literature, so I suppose being "taught" dystopia/utopian literature doesn't sit well with me. Perhaps its all the dark, I mean really dark, threads and such depressing nature of these stories that really get under my skin. Gah - I don't know what it is about this type of literature that I don't like. I just don't like it. :P Perhaps it's the characters, and their inherent whining and annoying qualities. HAHAHAHA!

I never thought of "Wall-E" as a dystopian story, as Darky pointed out, but I guess if you think about it, it really kind of is.

_________________
"So what? So plenty!"

Image
Sig: Teh Nurr

I've met Eru & Eä & Ellie & teh Arweb & Naur & Elenya & POTR!

POLKA WILL NEVER DIE!




Top
 Profile       WWW            
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron




Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Boyz theme by Zarron Media 2003